Development of performance training

Training plans are developed to upgrade or improve your skills and/or knowledge in any areas that may be lacking or do not meet required standards.

The following case studies provide examples of workers requiring training to perform their role effectively.

You can use a number of methods to improve your performance, including:

Role modelling

You can work on your skill development by modelling the conduct and skills demonstrated by others in your workplace.  You need to choose a co-worker who works to a high standard of performance; observe and practise these skills.

Coaching and mentoring

Coaching and mentoring involve ongoing contact with a more experienced co-worker, probably at a higher level than yours in the organisation.  This mentor or coach can provide guidance and advice about how to develop particular skills and gain certain information.  They may also give feedback on your progress and be available to assist when particular difficulties arise.  These sessions may be formal, such as a coaching session on a particular skill, or informal, such as a chat over a cup of coffee.

Reflective practice

Critical reflection is considered to be an important aspect of any profession. It ensures practitioners evaluate their own roles, skills and abilities. Examining what you do, acknowledging what you do well, and seeing what you can improve, is central to the art of working in children's services. Reflective practice ensures that care and education staff are constantly evaluating their roles and improving the quality of the program.

Self-evaluation

Self-evaluation means evaluating yourself. 
Strategies you can use include:

  • Thinking about what happened. List the facts without allowing your feelings to get in the way.
  • Imagining you are someone else and evaluating your performance from an onlooker’s perspective.

Sometimes we can only see a situation from our own point of view, and our own feelings may cloud our vision and the way we interpret what has happened.  When you list the facts instead of getting bogged down in feelings, you can more clearly see where errors of judgment have been made.
A reflective journal is a useful tool in self-evaluation. Through the use of this tool, you will be able to identify the strengths, skills and qualities you have already attained and those you need to work on to be an effective professional.  A reflective journal is a diary you use to write objective comments to learn and grow in your understanding.

Meeting your training and support needs

Staff training needs are usually identified by the organisation through one or a combination of the following:

  • formal performance appraisal to measure performance against a set of performance indicators 
  • skills assessment, an assessment process to identify the knowledge and skills needed for a job. 

An indication of a need for training and/or development may be identified by:

  • your supervisor, in an informal review of your performance or from feedback from clients
  • you, because you want to improve your performance or there is a lack of skill in some aspect of your job.

What are the options for having these needs met?

Job quality, customer service and support worker satisfaction may be compromised if training needs remain unmet.  The options for meeting training needs vary, depending on resources available for training and the organisation’s priorities at the time.  However, they should include:

  • on-the-job training by a co-worker, supervisor, or trainer
  • training conducted in-house
  • training conducted outside the workplace, either in a classroom or by working independently through workbooks at your own pace
  • on-the-job learning supported by a workplace mentor or coach.

Meeting your training and support needs

Staff training needs are usually identified by the organisation through one or a combination of the following:

  • formal performance appraisal to measure performance against a set of performance indicators 
  • skills assessment, an assessment process to identify the knowledge and skills needed for a job. 

An indication of a need for training and/or development may be identified by:

  • your supervisor, in an informal review of your performance or from feedback from clients
  • you, because you want to improve your performance or there is a lack of skill in some aspect of your job.

What are the options for having these needs met?

Job quality, customer service and support worker satisfaction may be compromised if training needs remain unmet.  The options for meeting training needs vary, depending on resources available for training and the organisation’s priorities at the time.  However, they should include:

  • on-the-job training by a co-worker, supervisor, or trainer
  • off- the- job training conducted in-house
  • off-the-job training conducted outside the workplace, either in a classroom or by working independently through workbooks at your own pace
  • on-the-job learning supported by a workplace mentor or coach.

Activity 2.2: Training options

Activity 2.2 (Word Document 40KB)

Last modified: Tuesday, 22 October 2013, 1:20 PM